When we stop thinking along the lines of some particular religious group of believers, we never hear of the Bible read like any other book, from beginning to end telling a single story in the form of a saga. A saga is generally a long story with a series of smaller stories, for example, the Game of Thrones or the Lord of the Rings, to name two. The Bible is also a saga. With 66 books that deal with the fall of man into sin and the resurrection of man through redemption. The particular genre is Dramatic Comedy since it begins in sorrow and ends in joy. 

Now that we have established the Bible as a book telling a story, we can examine the Bible as a literary work with elements common to other literary stories. First, we shall look at all accounts, whether in written, theatre, or film form establishes a setting for the story. A tale about St. Patrick would take place in Ireland and the 5th century. Therefore, a story has a background, a time, and a place where the story takes place. In the movies, the first scene is that of a location, a shot of the Empire State Building to suggest New York City. The Bible does the very same thing. It tells us the story takes place near the Tigers and Euphrates rivers, the Red Sea, the Jordon River, and the Sea of Galilee. Therefore, the Bible account area is where those rivers flow and the locations of those seas. The general site for the saga is from the Eastern portion of Egypt through Israel north to Turkey and west to include Jordon, Syria, Iraq, and Iran. In the Bible, this area would become known as Babylon. The only time this changes is when we read about Paul and Peter traveling through the Roman Empire and dying in Rome. 

The Bible also deals with how the people and the area change during the long period of the saga. First is a period before the flood. Next is the period after the flood and the period of slavery through conquest and destruction. We read the arrival and rejection of the Messiah, and finally, the Bible ends with Israel’s return and the building of the Third Temple and the return of the Messiah and God’s throne on earth. All of these various periods that place in the same area with the same people. Since the people in the saga are from the same bloodline, they are the survivors of the flood of the descendants of Shem, the patriarch of Abraham, the patriarch Jacob, the father of the twelve tribes of Israel. The twelve tribes of Israel and the tribe of Judah becoming the focus in the final chapters provides the reader of the Biblical saga with the protagonist-main character of the Biblical tale. The book of Revelation speaks of two prophets speaking in Israel in the final days. Therefore from beginning to end, the main character is always the nation of Israel.

Throughout the Bible story, the people of Israel no sooner are taken out of slavery by the Lord God turn and build an idol to worship. Time and time again, they turn their back on God. In the end, before the return of Jesus, they will worship a false messiah who will proclaim to be God in the final Temple. Some of those who claim to be Jewish are like Hamlet having a tragic ending, while those who accept Jesus Christ experience the joy of being together in a New Jerusalem with God.